Archives for 2013

Coursera’s Useful Genetics Wows

If you haven’t yet heard, college is expensive. Darn expensive. Thankfully, there are now free online universities for those of us daunted by the hefty price tag attached to traditional university courses. These online universities, such as Coursera and Udacity, provide quality courses taught by experienced ...

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Talking About Breast Cancer Risk

Angelina Jolie’s revelation in the New York Times today that she had a double mastectomy after learning about her genetic risk for breast cancer focused attention on the difficult dilemma faced by many women in similar circumstances. Jolie said she decided to write about her case to help other women. "I ...

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What Patients Say Works for Anxiety

For the live-updated, fully-labelled, interactive version of this graphic, click here. By Alexandra Carmichael, Co-Founder of CureTogether Anxiety is the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 18 percent of the U.S. population. According to a new study by CureTogether, the most effective ...

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A Birthday Wish For A Supercentenarian

Editor’s note: Pending an FDA decision, 23andMe no longer offers new customers in the United States access to health reports referred to in this post. Customers in the UK and Canada, as well as U.S. customers who purchased prior to November 22, 2013 will still be able to see their health reports, but those ...

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Mother Europe

The story of H is really the story of people in modern Europe. H refers to a maternal lineage — also known as a maternal haplogroup — that originated long ago in the Near East but expanded into Europe with the recession of the last Ice Age. H —with its dozens of subgroups — is the most prevalent haplogroup ...

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People Powered Research

by Anne Pinckard “’You have been asking me questions and taking my blood for years, but I do not know anything about what you have found.’” These words, spoken by a subject in an ongoing, 7-year prospective study of HIV-treatment in Uganda, prompted the researchers to take action—they decided to stage a ...

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Oregon Cavemen May Have Neanderthals All Wrong

By Amick Boone They once numbered 300 strong, but the Oregon Cavemen, members of a Grants Pass booster club formed in 1922 whose members claim to be “direct descendants of the Neanderthal,” are fading fast. Club members worry that as their numbers dwindle, soon there won’t be anyone around to protect ...

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What Patients Say Works for ADHD

For the live-updated, fully-labelled, interactive version of this infographic, click here. By Alexandra Carmichael, Co-Founder of CureTogether Although Attention-Defincit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has only been recognized as a disease in the last 20 years, patients already are well-versed in what ...

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Hey, It’s DNA Day

Although every day is DNA day for us here at 23andMe, today is actually National DNA Day. Established ten years ago, DNA Day is meant to encourage everyone to take a little time to learn more about genetics. It also commemorates the day in 1953 when James Watson and Francis Crick's discovery of the structure ...

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The Decade After Decoding

This month marks the tenth anniversary of one of the greatest scientific achievements of our time when in 2003 researchers decoded the last of the three billion letters that make up the human genome. Dr. Eric Green, director of the National Human Genome Project, spoke with reporters a week ago saying that ...

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