Author: 23andMe

Behind the Scenes at the Lab

Curiosity. The desire to be informed and healthier. The need to know ourselves and our histories better. Whatever your reason is for joining 23andMe, we make it pretty simple. Order a kit, create an account, spit in a tube, and mail it back. In just a few weeks, you log on to the website and learn what your ...

Read more

Craving Coffee Might be Genetic

By Amick B. There are many studies that look at the health impacts of drinking coffee, but you’d be forgiven if you weren’t clear about whether it’s good for you. Research has found consuming coffee could potentially prevent heart disease, type-2 diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and liver cancer, but the ...

Read more

Getting Long in the Telomeres

Robin Smith, Health Content Scientist Barring injury, disease or capture, some scientists believe that a lobster could live virtually forever. They are amongst a select group of animals, including tortoises, clams and jellyfish, that are "negligibly senescent." They don't age much. So why aren't we ...

Read more

DNA Melody, Play it Again

Mark Ackerley speaking about DNA Melody at the Cleveland Clinic's Personal Healthcare Summit. Mark Ackerley, a composer and a member of 23andMe's marketing team, recently spoke at a personalized medicine conference about his creation, DNA Melody. While there, a string quartet performed a composition he wrote ...

Read more

Mutiny (and Headaches) on the Bounty

By Robin Smith, Health Content Scientist at 23andMe Image courtesy of Wikimedia Commons. In January of 1790, a small band of mutineers from the HMS Bounty evaded capture by the British Navy and settled Pitcairn Island in the South Pacific. The direct descendants of this crew (and their captive Tahitian ...

Read more

Talking About Breast Cancer Risk

Angelina Jolie’s revelation in the New York Times today that she had a double mastectomy after learning about her genetic risk for breast cancer focused attention on the difficult dilemma faced by many women in similar circumstances. Jolie said she decided to write about her case to help other women. "I ...

Read more

What Patients Say Works for Anxiety

For the live-updated, fully-labelled, interactive version of this graphic, click here. By Alexandra Carmichael, Co-Founder of CureTogether Anxiety is the most common mental illness in the U.S., affecting 18 percent of the U.S. population. According to a new study by CureTogether, the most effective ...

Read more

People Powered Research

by Anne Pinckard “’You have been asking me questions and taking my blood for years, but I do not know anything about what you have found.’” These words, spoken by a subject in an ongoing, 7-year prospective study of HIV-treatment in Uganda, prompted the researchers to take action—they decided to stage a ...

Read more

Oregon Cavemen May Have Neanderthals All Wrong

By Amick Boone They once numbered 300 strong, but the Oregon Cavemen, members of a Grants Pass booster club formed in 1922 whose members claim to be “direct descendants of the Neanderthal,” are fading fast. Club members worry that as their numbers dwindle, soon there won’t be anyone around to protect ...

Read more

What Patients Say Works for ADHD

For the live-updated, fully-labelled, interactive version of this infographic, click here. By Alexandra Carmichael, Co-Founder of CureTogether Although Attention-Defincit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) has only been recognized as a disease in the last 20 years, patients already are well-versed in what ...

Read more

Return to top