Category: 23andMe and you

More on ABO Blood Type: The Key to Compatibility

When it comes to blood transfusions, what's good for one person might be deadly for another. This might seem obvious today, but until 1900 the idea of "blood types" wasn’t understood. A person in need of a transfusion could find himself getting a donation from just about anyone, and sometimes even an ...

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Novel Techniques Suggest Neanderthal Populations Dwindled in the Face of Expanding Humans

The Neanderthals have always held a special place in the field of anthropology.  The skeletal remains of our short, stocky evolutionary relatives have been found everywhere from Spain to Iraq. Their physical likeness to our own species, and the possibility that humans and Neanderthals may have interacted, ...

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The Disappearing Y: New Study Uncovers the History and Future of the Y Chromosome

It may be you've heard a rumor that males are on the brink of extinction. Whatever you may think of that prospect, the rumor is false. But over the past decade, numerous studies have hinted that the Y chromosome, a male necessity, is going the way of the dodo. Though other studies have suggested this ...

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Archaeologists Discover Early Example of Domesticated Camels

Most experts agree that the earliest examples of farming and animal domestication lie in the aptly named Fertile Crescent, in present day Iraq.  But still many questions have lingered over the years, especially with regard to remnants of farming or animal domestication that have not survived to the present ...

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Introducing a Do-It-Yourself Revolution in Disease Research

There's a high likelihood that a disease of some sort affects you or one of your relatives — every family seems to have ripples in its gene pool that define and shape its health dynamics. Your family might have a propensity for rheumatoid arthritis or a particular type of cancer. Whatever it is, there can ...

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People of the Veil: New Study Reveals Clues to Origins of the Nomadic Tuaregs

Not many people could survive the harsh conditions of the Sahara Desert.  Yet the Tuareg have lived in the the region for millennia. The Tuareg call themselves the Imazghan, meaning "free people." Today they are known for a distinctive dark blue turban worn by the men, and for their long history as ...

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SNPwatch: Genetic Variation May Make It Harder For Expectant Moms To Quit Smoking

SNPwatch gives you the latest news about research linking various traits and conditions to individual genetic variations. These studies are exciting because they offer a glimpse into how genetics may affect our bodies and health; but in most cases, more work is needed before this research can provide ...

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23andMe Joins Forces With San Diego’s Palomar Pomerado Health To Encourage Preventative Care

23andMe is proud to announce that, starting today, San Diego’s Palomar Pomerado Health (PPH), California’s largest public health district, will be offering our service to its members. This partnership marks the first time that a health care organization has provided our Personal Genome Service™ to members of ...

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DNA Day 2009 – It’s Almost Here!

DNA Day was created in 2003 by a congressional resolution to celebrate two important milestones in the study of genetics: the 50th anniversary of the description of the double-helix structure of DNA by James D. Watson and Francis H.C. Crick and the completion of the Human Genome Project. DNA Day is usually ...

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Baby, It’s Cold Outside: Researchers Tie Variation in Cancer Gene to Winter Temperatures

How can geneticists tell when a genetic difference between two human populations is an accident and when it’s the result of natural selection? As our species moved out of Africa and spread out across the globe, there were a lot of chances for random DNA mutations to occur.  Many of these were neutral – ...

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