Category: SNPWatch

SNPwatch: Genetic Variant Contributing to Melanoma Risk has Different Effects on Mole Count Depending on Age

Melanoma is a rare but deadly form of skin cancer. Known risk factors include pale skin, large numbers of moles (also known as nevi), and prolonged sun exposure. Nevus count has a strong genetic component and researchers have already identified some genetic variants that influence the trait. In a new study ...

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SNPwatch: New Genetic Associations Revealed for Nasopharyngeal Carcinoma

Nasopharyngeal cancer (NPC) arises in the upper part of the throat, behind the nose.  It is rare in most areas of the world—affecting only about 1 in every 100,000 people—but about 25 times more common in southern China, earning it the name "Cantonese Cancer."  NPC rates are also high in southeastern Asia, ...

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SNPwatch: Genetic Variants Associated with Risk of Paget’s Disease of Bone Identified

Aching joints and bones aren't always just a normal part of aging.  For some, they are a symptom of Paget's disease of bone (PDB), a condition that affects more than one million people over the age of 45 in the United States. Bone tissue is constantly being recycled.  As old bone is broken down, new bone ...

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SNPwatch: Two Studies Connect More Immune System Genes to Rheumatoid Arthritis

Rheumatoid arthritis is a common autoimmune disease in which the individual's own immune system attacks the lining of the joints, causing stiffness and muscle aches. Like other autoimmune diseases, development of rheumatoid arthritis is likely caused by a complex combination of genetic and environmental ...

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SNPwatch: Large Study Identifies Two More Genetic Variants Associated with Alzheimer’s Disease

Understanding Alzheimer's disease, the most common cause of dementia in people 65 years and older, is of the utmost importance as the population of the United States (and many other nations) becomes increasingly older.  Currently more than five million Americans are thought to have the disease, but by the ...

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SNPwatch: Genetic Variant May Impact Rate of Cognitive Decline in the Elderly

New research, published recently in the journal Neurology, has found the surprising result that a genetic variant previously associated with better cognitive function in young people appears to have the opposite effect as people get older. Alexandra Fiocco and colleagues from the University of California, ...

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SNPwatch: Genetic Variant Associated with Food Allergy-related Disorder Eosinophilic Esophagitis

For the millions of children and adults with severe food allergies, ingesting even tiny quantities of some of the most basic foods can result in a potentially deadly reaction.  Milk, eggs, nuts, fish, shellfish, soy and wheat are some of the most common offenders. Some people with food sensitivities have ...

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SNPwatch: More Genetic Variations Linked to AMD, a Leading Cause of Vision Loss

Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the most common cause of irreversible vision loss in the western world among people over 60. The two forms of the disease – wet and dry – both cause vision loss by destroying cells in the central portion of the retina. In the last few years, progress in ...

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SNPwatch: Three New Genetic Variants Associated with Brain Aneurysm Identified

An aneurysm occurs when the wall of a blood vessel weakens and balloons outward, making the blood vessel abnormally large. The larger the vessel becomes, the greater the risk of rupture — a serious emergency. Often there are no symptoms of an aneurysm until a rupture occurs. Brain (also known as intracranial) ...

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SNPwatch: Believe It Or Not, Researchers Find Genetic Variant Linked To Gullibility

We’ve all fallen for a prank at some point or another – whether it be “hey, your shoe’s untied” or getting surprised at your birthday party after your friend asks you to “just pick up something from the house.” Most people become more wary as they get older but other people manage to remain fundamentally ...

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