Category: Ancestry

Adoption and 23andMe: Filling Gaps in Your Family Tree

If you were adopted, conceived through sperm donation or don’t know your parents for some other reason, 23andMe can give you a glimpse into your genetic legacy. Our service can’t help you locate your biological parents or reveal their medical histories – but it can provide some information about their ...

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New Feature: Ancestry Painting

It was not very long ago – at least in evolutionary terms – that humans first ventured beyond the continent of their species’ birth. But once people did begin migrating out of Africa about 50,000 years ago to populate the lands we now call the Middle East, Asia, Europe and the Americas, the transformation of ...

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Why Ancestry Makes a Difference

Those of you who have delved into our Gene Journal (now called Health and Traits) feature may have noticed that many of the traits only give genetic data “assuming European ethnicity”. Why is that? It certainly isn’t because people with African or Asian ancestry aren’t susceptible to heart attacks or ...

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The Amazing Journey: A New Synthesis for the Peopling of America

People who study the spread of humans to the Americas can agree on one thing – the first migrants crossed from Asia by way of a land bridge connecting Siberia and Alaska. Just about everything else is subject to debate: who the people were, where they originated, when they migrated, how numerous they were ...

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23andMore: Paternal Ancestry, Free Demo Accounts and an Expanded Gene Journal

Genetics is big on twos. Chromosomes come in pairs. So do DNA strands – the two twisting halves of the molecule fit together perfectly, with every A matched to a T and every G to a C. That's why we consider the latest additions to the 23andMe website particularly cosmic. Each one perfectly complements an ...

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The World in a Pipette: Two Studies Look at Human DNA Diversity

If you take two members of the human race at random and ask how much their genomes differ, you'll get a surprising answer: they're almost identical. On average, for every 1,000 DNA bases you have, 999 or so of them are exactly the same between you and your neighbor – and for that matter, between you and ...

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Aren’t We All the Same?

Credit: Moncrief It’s well established that at the DNA level, humans are about 99.9% identical. But the slight genetic differences that account for the remaining 0.1% can have significant consequences when it comes to genetic research. In genome-wide association (GWA) studies, scientists look at ...

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