Category: news

The Rest of the Iceberg

In a recent post we used an analysis of Craig Venter’s genome to illustrate how much has yet to be learned about the relationship between genetic variation and health-related traits. A new paper by Venter and colleagues at his Rockville, Maryland-based institute provides a prime example. Writing in the ...

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Defrosted Disappointment

Despite CNET's assertion last week that Bigfoot couldn't possibly be a hoax because people always bring their A game to Palo Alto, the carcass in the ice has turned out to be a rubber gorilla suit. And the freezer wasn't that big either. Sorry, Bigfoot believers, this means the DNA evidence presented at ...

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Sasquatchsicle Anyone?

On Friday, we sent 23andMe Science Writing Intern Massie Ballon to the most unusual science news event she has ever covered — the announcement in a Palo Alto hotel that two men had discovered the body of a creature they believe to be Bigfoot while hiking in the woods of northern Georgia. This is her ...

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A Matter of Motivation

The following post is by Esther Dyson, a director at 23andMe and investor in numerous private aviation, space and health care ventures, including PatientsLikeMe. Last weekend I attended Science Foo Camp, a sort of grown-up summer camp for scientists sponsored by Google (an investor in 23andMe), Nature ...

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One Man’s Exons: Craig Venter’s Genome Offers Clues About the Future of Personal Genomics

What we know today about the correlation between genetic variation and observable effects on people's health, physical appearance and other traits is just the tip of the iceberg, according to a paper published Friday in PLoS Genetics. The paper analyzes Craig Venter's exons — the parts of the genome that ...

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Learning from Dog Eye Disorders

Dogs have served humans as guards, guides, retrievers, shepherds and companions for more than 10,000 years. Now geneticists are enlisting their help in another task — identifying the genetic roots of diseases that affect both man and beast. Dogs suffer from a number of inherited eye conditions; the ...

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Did Neanderthals and Humans Mate? The Answer, Again, is No

(Ed: Newer research suggests that Homo sapiens and Neanderthals did in fact interbreed. On average, two to four percent of DNA in present-day humans who trace their ancestry from Europe or Asia comes from our Neanderthal cousins. 23andMe customers can check out their own Neanderthal ancestry here! -- ...

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The Origins of Pastoralism in Africa: What do the Genes Say

This guest post is by Brenna Henn, a doctoral student in Stanford University's Department of Anthropology and a 23andMe consultant. Brenna studies human evolution using genetic information. Her interests include the origin of modern humans, migration patterns among African groups, and genetic models of ...

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Meet the 23andMe Team: Brian Hawthorne

Brian spends his days deep within the heart of the 23andMe web infrastructure. He is a software engineer with long experience in the biomedical field, having previously supported pharmacogenomics and brain imaging endeavors. In addition to being ready and willing to automate himself out of a job, Brian is ...

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Needles in a Haystack

Even as the genetic studies on schizophrenia released this week illustrate our progress toward the ultimate goal of personalized medicine, they also bring to mind the challenges that still lie ahead. All three studies focus on identifying the genetic bases of schizophrenia, a mental disorder characterized by ...

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