Search Results for: snpwatch

Back to School Smarts and Genetics

If you want to stir up trouble, start talking about the role genetics plays in intelligence. First there’s the whole question of what you’re talking about: Is intelligence measured through mathematical skills, problem solving, perceiving emotions, or a raw score from an I.Q. test? Not to be glib but ...

Read more

No Hype Over Hypothyroidism

What do media mogul Oprah Winfrey, actress Mary-Louise Parker, and Olympic runner Carl Lewis have in common? Aside from their more than 15 minutes of fame, all three have been diagnosed with hypothyroidism, a condition where the body does not make enough thyroid hormone. This, in turn, can lead to fatigue, ...

Read more

Gene Fusions Point to a New Type of Sarcoma

The term “sarcoma” encompasses over a hundred forms of rare cancers, and the cause behind many of these forms is unknown. Ewing sarcoma, however, is one sarcoma for which the biology is relatively well understood.  This form is caused by a gene fusion -- a DNA rearrangement resulting in two genes being fused ...

Read more

Health Watch: New Year’s Resolutions, Reproduction and Rare Diseases

Like many people around the world, the health content team at 23andMe rang in 2012 with resolutions of staying healthy and it seemed fitting to delve into the genetics underlying response to diet and exercise, eating behavior and cholesterol levels. As we eased in to the new year, we segued into reproduction, ...

Read more

When DNA Discoveries Hit Close to Home

In August of last year, I wrote  with hope and excitement about the launch of the 23andMe MPN Research Initiative because my father, Harvey, suffers from myelofibrosis.  On March 5, 23andMe scientist Bethann Hromatka posted a SNPWatch report about the association between the JAK2 gene and MPNs. 23andMe ...

Read more

The Debate Over Clopidogrel Continues

In December a new study created quite a stir in the already-volatile clopidogrel research community. Clopidogrel (trade names Plavix®) is a commonly prescribed anti-clotting drug. It is inactive in the body until a protein encoded by the gene CYP2C19 converts the drug to its active form. Some people are able ...

Read more

Seeking the Secrets of the Super Long-Lived

With analytical contributions from 23andMe Scientist David Hinds For all human history people have been obsessed with their own mortality. Early explorers searched the globe for the mythical “fountain of youth,” and now scientists are turning that exploration inward to look at the genomes of people who’ve ...

Read more

Our Top 10 for 2011

We thought 2010 would be hard to top but we’re happy to say that 2011 has been even better. Scientists uncovered new insights into serious conditions like type 2 diabetes and autoimmune disorders as well as traits like iris patterns. New research has also improved our understanding of the genetics of obesity, ...

Read more

Let’s Talk About Sex… in GWAS

By Bethann Hromatka The saying “men are from Mars, women are from Venus,” may have originated from personality differences between the sexes, but it also rings true for complex diseases that affect one sex more than the other. For instance, the prevalence of autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid ...

Read more

23andMe’s Third Publication Demonstrates Efficient Replication of Over 180 Genetic Associations

As we’ve mentioned here previously, science can be a slow process. Researchers spend a long time -- sometimes upward of five years -- gathering enough people with a particular disease to study, collecting samples and data from them, analyzing that data, and then publishing the results. Imagine if you had to ...

Read more

Return to top