Tag: ancestry

African American Roots: What Genetics Can Reveal

Because their ancestors often were slaves during the 18th and 19th centuries, and therefore usually lacked birth or death certificates, it is very difficult for African American genealogists to trace their ancestors further than a few generations. Even when they can trace their ancestry to the slavery era, it ...

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ASHG Releases Ancestry Testing Statement Emphasizing Interpretation

The American Society for Human Genetics (ASHG) has released a statement outlining a set of recommendations for genetic ancestry testing. At a press briefing on Thursday, members of the ASHG Ancestry Testing Task Force Committee discussed two main themes: the need for clear communication about the ...

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23andMe at CSB

23andMe (in the form of Serge Saxonov and me, Brian Naughton) will be at the 7th Annual International Conference on Computational Systems Bioinformatics at Stanford this Tuesday. We will be giving a tutorial on some of the more technical and scientific aspects of 23andme's service. It's not all glitz and ...

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A Different Kind of Gene Mapping: Comparing Genetic and Geographic Structure in Europe

By Chris Gignoux and Mike Macpherson It should be no surprise that in general, we are more genetically similar to our neighbors than to people living far away. The reason is fairly simple — until recently in human history it was fairly rare for people from widely separated geographic regions to even meet, ...

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Did Neanderthals and Humans Mate? The Answer, Again, is No

(Ed: Newer research suggests that Homo sapiens and Neanderthals did in fact interbreed. On average, two to four percent of DNA in present-day humans who trace their ancestry from Europe or Asia comes from our Neanderthal cousins. 23andMe customers can check out their own Neanderthal ancestry here! -- ...

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The Origin of Farming in Europe: A View from the Y Chromosome

This guest post is by Roy King, who is a professor of psychiatry at Stanford University and a research colleague of Stanford geneticist and 23andMe scientific adviser Peter Underhill. Roy and Peter have been using genetics to trace the spread of agriculture from the Near East to Europe. The question of ...

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The family that spits together…

You’ve always known that you have your dad’s curly hair, your mother’s eyes, and your grandmother’s coloring. But now that you’ve got your data back from 23andMe, you find yourself wondering whose side of the family the wet ear wax comes from (everyone denies having it), as well as whom to thank for the ...

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Benvinguts a Barcelona: Notes from the 2008 Society of Molecular Biology and Evolution Conference

This month I had the opportunity to go to the Society of Molecular Biology and Evolution conference in the striking city of Barcelona. This is the premiere conference for geneticists studying evolution in everything from bacteria to fruit flies, weeds, worms and our favorite model organism, humans! This is a ...

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A Genetic Look at “Guns, Germs and Steel”

What can we learn from studying how variations of human genes are spread out around the world? A lot, said population geneticist and Harvard junior fellow Sohini Ramachandran, who spoke at 23andMe this week. Ramachandran focused on how genes spread from one continent to another, and how they vary within ...

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A Beautiful Ancestry Painting

Roy King is a clinical psychiatrist at Stanford University. He’s also a scholar who uses genetics and archaeology to figure out how agriculture spread through Anatolia and the Mediterranean region of Europe more than 10,000 years ago. Now Roy has another genetic puzzle to consider – himself. With the help ...

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