SNPwatch: Association Between FTO Variant and Obesity Depends on Age and Impacts Development

Editor’s note: Pending an FDA decision, 23andMe no longer offers new customers access to health reports referred to in this post. Customers who purchased prior to November 22, 2013 will still be able to see their health reports, but those who purchased after that time will not. Those customers will have access to ancestry information as well as access to their uninterpreted raw data.

Obesity is an enormous public health concern in the United States, affecting about 33% of adults and 20% of children and adolescents. While lifestyle and environmental factors play an undeniable role in whether an individual becomes obese, researchers have also uncovered common genetic variants that influence risk for the condition. One of the best-studied variants is in the FTO gene, which has been shown to be associated with obesity in young adults. However, studies in different age groups have revealed subtle differences in the effect of the FTO variant on obesity risk.

To better characterize the effects of throughout childhood development, an international team of researchers from the Early Growth Genetics Consortium (EGGC) analyzed data from eight study populations, totaling nearly 20,000 individuals of European descent. Their results, published last week in PLoS Genetics, showed a distinct relationship between the A version of and BMI that depended on age. In older children (ages 6-13), each copy of an A at was associated with a slight increase in BMI. The opposite was true in children younger than two years, however — each copy of the A version was associated a slight decrease in BMI.

(23andMe customers can view their data for using the Browse Raw Data feature. Another variant in FTO, , is used in the Obesity Established Research report. This variant is equivalent to .)

BMI versus age by FTO genotype

The switch in association from lower BMI to higher BMI occurred between 4-6 years of age, corresponding with a phenomenon known as “adiposity rebound” (AR). During normal development, infants experience rapidly increasing BMI, peaking around age one, followed by decreasing BMI that bottoms out around age five before rising again. AR refers to this second rise in BMI, and the EGGC study found that the A version of was also associated with earlier AR. (See figure to the right from the EGGC paper.)

It turns out that the timing of AR can have implications later in life. Multiple studies have linked earlier AR to higher BMI in adulthood, along with increased risk for obesity-related diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Based on their findings, the EGGC researchers suggest that the connection between the FTO gene and obesity may have less to do with a general predisposition to obesity and more to do with childhood development and timing of AR. This observation may provide greater insight into the biological mechanisms underlying obesity, though additional studies are needed to confirm and refine the EGGC results.

SNPwatch gives you the latest news about research linking various traits and conditions to individual genetic variations. These studies are exciting because they offer a glimpse into how genetics may affect our bodies and health; but in most cases, more work is needed before this research can provide information of value to individuals. For that reason it is important to remember that like all information we provide, the studies we describe in SNPwatch are for research and educational purposes only. SNPwatch is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice; you should always seek the advice of your physician or other appropriate healthcare professional with any questions you may have regarding diagnosis, cure, treatment or prevention of any disease or other medical condition.


  • http://mygenomix.wordpress.com Moreno

    Hi!

    Why rs9939609 is not included in the Obesity Report? Is it patented?
    You say that rs3751812 is equivalent to rs9939609; is it because they are in linkage disequilibrium?

    Thanks!

    • http://23andme.com Shwu

      Hi Moreno,

      Yes, rs3751812 is perfectly correlated to rs9939609 in European and Asian populations.The two SNPs are not very well correlated in African populations. Note also that the association between FTO and obesity is also not as well established in African and Asian populations as it is in European populations.

  • Radmila

    Hi!

    I would like to ask wchich SNPs are detected in screening to obesity.

    Thanks

    • http://23andme.com Shwu

      Hi Radmila,

      23andMe does not do screening for obesity, but does report on genetic variants that can influence one’s risk for obesity. The report uses information about rs3751812 (equivalent to rs9939609) and rs10871777. We also provide information about preliminary research potentially linking the SNPs rs6232 and rs7566605 to obesity. Other services may report on different genetic variants.

      Note that non-genetic factors play an important role in the development of obesity as well.

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