Tag: mtDNA

Mito Mightily Disappoints Autism Researchers

By Amick B. Research shows a strong genetic basis for autism, but for years scientists have been unable to pinpoint the specific genetic variants associated with the condition, which may affect as many as one in 88 children in the United States. For some time now researchers have speculated that ...

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Back to School: Sex Chromosomes Quiz Results

The 23rd Chromosome This month we’ve run a series of quizzes for the back-to-school season. Here’s are the answers to our third and final quiz. Congratulations to Toni K., who was selected randomly from the large group of test takers who got all the answers right. You can see how you did by comparing with ...

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Back to School: All About Sex… Chromosomes

We know you’ve been studying hard at 23andMe U., but you’ve still got one more quiz to complete. This one hinges on some of the genetic differences between men and women. So before you matriculate, here’s the last quiz. Now don’t sweat it, you’ll do fine and we’ll even give you some hints along the way to ...

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Revealed: The Genetic Origin and History of an Elusive Anabaptist Community

There are over 50,000 people in North America who define themselves as Hutterites, though you probably have never met one. One of the main branches of the Anabaptists, Hutterites live in self-sustaining communities throughout the rural northwestern United States and Canada. Like their sister branches, the ...

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Europe’s First Farmers Came from Afar: New Clues Shed Light on Genetic Ancestry of Modern Europeans

About 10,000 years ago, the prehistoric hunter-gatherers of Europe began meeting some new neighbors. These farmers spread gradually at first, expanding from the Near East through Anatolia and the Balkans. Then agriculture exploded, reaching present-day Britain within a few thousand years. The farmers ...

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Direct Genetic Link between Australia and India Provides New Insight into the Origins of Australian Aborigines

In 1974, scientists digging in the dry lake bed of Lake Mungo in southeastern Australia uncovered the skeleton of a man preserved in the deep layers of sand and clay. Dating techniques eventually revealed that this individual died about 40,000 years ago. Scientists and the popular press dubbed the ...

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Novel Techniques Suggest Neanderthal Populations Dwindled in the Face of Expanding Humans

The Neanderthals have always held a special place in the field of anthropology.  The skeletal remains of our short, stocky evolutionary relatives have been found everywhere from Spain to Iraq. Their physical likeness to our own species, and the possibility that humans and Neanderthals may have interacted, ...

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DNA Analysis Confirms Remains of Famed 16th Century Astronomer Nicolaus Copernicus

Nicolaus Copernicus is probably the second most famous astronomer in history (after Galileo). He is best known for being the first to propose that the Earth circles the sun, and not the other way around. His theory ran into one problem, however. It was contrary both to conventional wisdom and Roman ...

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People of the Veil: New Study Reveals Clues to Origins of the Nomadic Tuaregs

Not many people could survive the harsh conditions of the Sahara Desert.  Yet the Tuareg have lived in the the region for millennia. The Tuareg call themselves the Imazghan, meaning "free people." Today they are known for a distinctive dark blue turban worn by the men, and for their long history as ...

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New Study Reveals Complex Origins of the Malagasy

Only 250 miles separates the island of Madagascar from the southeast coast of Africa.  The short distance between the two land masses traditionally led the outside world to assume that the native inhabitants of Madagascar - known as the Malagasy - originally came from the west, probably from the present day ...

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