Author: AnneH

Revealed: The Genetic Origin and History of an Elusive Anabaptist Community

There are over 50,000 people in North America who define themselves as Hutterites, though you probably have never met one. One of the main branches of the Anabaptists, Hutterites live in self-sustaining communities throughout the rural northwestern United States and Canada. Like their sister branches, the ...

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23andMe Scientists Harness Linguistics to Describe Origin and History of Paternal Haplogroup J1e

The Near East – a swath of land that encompasses the Arabian Peninsula, the Levant, and everywhere in between – has been populated by humans longer than anywhere else in the world save Africa. It is where agriculture was born and spread into Eurasia. It is where the ancient civilizations of Mesopotamia and ...

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Life on the Fringe: Shrews and Voles Reveal Clues to British Prehistory

Through the millennia wave after wave of migrants - often in the form of invading armies – have descended upon the British Isles. The first people to arrive after the Ice Age were hunter-gatherers who followed their prey north from southern Europe about 12,000 years ago. The Celts came from central Europe ...

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New Genetic Analysis Sheds Light on Origins of Indian Castes

For as long as humans have lived in complex communities, cities and civilizations, they have divided and classified their societies. Those divisions have been based on age, gender, appearance or - in many cases - occupation. In many traditional societies artisans would share the same social status; as would ...

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Human Prehistory 101: Out of (Eastern) Africa

Take a look at the second installment of 23andMe's Human Prehistory 101 series.  23andMe's creative team (led by chief illustrator Ariana Killoran) recently released "Out of (Eastern) Africa."  With this new installment, we pick up where the previous video left off, when humans were starting to take their ...

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Europe’s First Farmers Came from Afar: New Clues Shed Light on Genetic Ancestry of Modern Europeans

About 10,000 years ago, the prehistoric hunter-gatherers of Europe began meeting some new neighbors. These farmers spread gradually at first, expanding from the Near East through Anatolia and the Balkans. Then agriculture exploded, reaching present-day Britain within a few thousand years. The farmers ...

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New Study on Genetics of Ethnic Groups Reveals We May Not Be So Different After All

There are many examples around the world of two distinct ethnic groups living side by side. Sometimes these groups co-exist peacefully. Other times they do not. Often two groups' differences - along with circumstantial factors - lead to tension between them and sometimes violence. The Hutus and Tutsis ...

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The First Population Explosion: Human Numbers Expanded Dramatically Millennia Before Agriculture

Ten millennia ago, there were about six million people on Earth. Today, there are six billion. This thousandfold increase in the global population is often thought to be linked to the invention of farming and the domestication of animals about 13,000 years ago in the Near East. Growing crops and raising ...

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Direct Genetic Link between Australia and India Provides New Insight into the Origins of Australian Aborigines

In 1974, scientists digging in the dry lake bed of Lake Mungo in southeastern Australia uncovered the skeleton of a man preserved in the deep layers of sand and clay. Dating techniques eventually revealed that this individual died about 40,000 years ago. Scientists and the popular press dubbed the ...

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Novel Techniques Suggest Neanderthal Populations Dwindled in the Face of Expanding Humans

The Neanderthals have always held a special place in the field of anthropology.  The skeletal remains of our short, stocky evolutionary relatives have been found everywhere from Spain to Iraq. Their physical likeness to our own species, and the possibility that humans and Neanderthals may have interacted, ...

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