Category: recommended reading

Long Overdue Recognition

If you don’t know who Evelyn Witkins is perhaps you should. A legendary figure in genetic science, the 94 year-old professor emerita at Rutgers University was awarded in September a Lasker Prize for Basic Medical Research, sometimes referred to as “America’s Nobel.” We here at the blog neglected to ...

Read more

23andMe In The News

23andMe's had a busy week with a lot of media coverage of our new customer experience. For everyone here at 23andMe, the notice is a nice moment after two years of hard work. A lot went into the new experience  from extensive consumer comprehension studies to creative design work that better communicates ...

Read more

Mapping It Out

DNA has been described as both a recipe for life and a record of it, and computational biologist John Novembre — who recently received a MacArthur Foundation “genius grant” for his work — is showing just how powerful melding those two elements together can be for scientists. Novembre, who we first ...

Read more

More Than Just Luck

The amazing CeCe Moore, a genetic genealogist and 23andMe Ancestry Ambassador, has done it again, solving a family mystery and helping a woman connect with her biological mother for the first time. “DNA,” Moore told the Orange County Register, “was the only way to solve this.” The story, which appeared ...

Read more

Invisible History

In her wonderful book, “The Invisible History of the Human Race,” writer and journalist Christine Kenneally conveys how your life is part of a thread of life that extends both backward and forward in time. “We live in a temporal envelope,” Kenneally writes. “For most of us the horizon extends forward maybe ...

Read more

Gut Check — A Short List of IBD Blogs

It might not be genetic but there appears to be a clear association between having inflammatory bowel disease and having a damn good sense of humor. IBD is a serious digestive disorder and is no laughing matter. The umbrella diagnosis includes both Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, and affects an ...

Read more

A Primer on What’s In Your Genes?

Writing clearly about something complicated like genetics isn’t easy, and doing it with a little humor is harder still. But that’s just what the author and illustrator Katie McKissick, does consistently in her neat little book called “What’s in Your Genes?” Known by her nom de plume, Beatrice the ...

Read more

A Gift To Humanity

Here at 23andMe we have an interest in all things Neanderthal, so when none other than Svante Pääbo authored the book Neanderthal Man: In Search of Lost Genomes we had to check it out. Professor Pääbo, the director of evolutionary genetics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in ...

Read more

More Neanderthal

Scientists at the University of Washington’s Department of Genome Sciences, report that they can zero in on remnant Neanderthal DNA in modern humans, identifying specific regions in our genome where that ancient DNA resides, and they can do this even without access to actual Neanderthal DNA samples from ...

Read more

This Year’s Top Ten Genetic Findings

Each year at this time 23andMe puts together a list of the most interesting genetic findings of 2013. We’re doing that again but with a twist. We want to include in our list a few things that aren’t findings or discoveries, but clearly these stories have had a huge impact on the field of genetics. The fact ...

Read more

Return to top